Next to its famous cousin, phở (Vietnamese rice noodles soup), the rice paper roll is probably one of the other more well-known Vietnamese favourites. In general, the spring roll-like combination of rice paper, salad, noodles, shrimp or pork is rather bland which I take it to mean – uber healthy! There’s not a single drop of oil used in this recipe, and everything in it is either boiled or steamed.

All the yumminess lie in the dipping sauce – Nước chấm – which is generally a concoction of fish sauce, lime/lemon juice/vinegar, sugar and optional aromatics like garlic and chilli.

Rice paper comes in stiff round sheets which is softened in a shallow dish of hot/warm water and then placed on a clean tea towel for some rolling action. The filling ingredients are kept simple and fresh. In this shrimp roll, I used carrots, lettuce, cucumber, coriander, cooked shrimp and cooked rice noodles. When there’s too much filling, it gets tricky handling the now sticky rice paper and the strands of rice noodles or lettuce that insists on sticking out…The key is to not over-fill and leave enough space around the sides of the rice paper for folding and rolling.

The internals are ready!

Leave sufficient space around the sides for folding or else it'd get tricky

It’s a great entrée to serve at dinner parties, or as canapés or snacks. The good thing is that the rolls stay fresh covered with a damp cloth for a few hours, so it’s a great dish that can be prepared ahead of time.

Ingredients for rice paper roll:

–          rice paper
–          julienned carrot
–          coriander leaves
–          shredded lettuce
–          julienned cucumber
–          cooked shrimps (split in half)
–          handful of cooked rice noodles

Basic Nước chấm:

Makes ¾ cup

3-4 tablespoons lime/lemon juice
2 tablespoons sugar
½ cup water
2 ½ tablespoons fish sauce

Optional additions:
1 small garlic clove, finely minced
1 or 2 birds eye chilli, finely minced

Combine all the ingredients together, taste and adjust accordingly. There should be a good balance of tartness and sweetness. Once you’re happy with the sauce, add garlic and chilli and let the sauce sit for at least 30 minutes.

Advertisements

Join the conversation! 32 Comments

  1. This looks really yummy and healthy!!! I must try making it here!! Where’d you get the rice paper from? Do you take orders????? :D

    Reply
  2. These look really fresh and healthy. I’ve never made Vietnamese food before… I think I have to now!

    Reply
  3. […] from Vietnamese Rice Paper Rolls, I have never tried making vietnamese food at home. It always just seemed easier to pop into a […]

    Reply
  4. […] Lots of fun and a lot of Vietnamese Spring Rolls. if you want to see where I leant to make then follow this link. We had hundreds of kids and their parents come to the festival to meet authors and have a book […]

    Reply
  5. I love rice paper rolls too! Such a great healthy and fresh meal. However because I don’t eat meat, I cook it without prawns – using mushrooms, capsicum, cucumber, like here http://www.makeamealoutofthis.com/2011/10/rice-paper-rolls.html

    Reply
  6. I use Hoisin Sauce mixed with 1 tsp of peanut butter….to dip the wraps into !

    Reply
  7. typically they are made with cilantro not coriander leaves.. i love these, grew up on them!

    Reply
  8. Love these recipes! Got to try them now that I’m trying to eat right.

    Reply
  9. Did the recipe exactly as you have outlined and the entire family loved it! Thank you for sharing! Regards!

    Reply
  10. I slam dunked your recipe, I made it for snacks in the lunches! What a wonderful way to snack don’t you think? Question….how do you store these rolls without them sticking to everything? I made a huge batch, knowing I didn’t have time to make them everyday.

    Reply
    • Glad you loved these rolls of goodness! :) there’s no real good way of storing them, they will stick, it’s just how they are. But you can prevent them from drying out by covering with a damp tea towel or paper towels and cling wrapping the whole thing.

      Reply
  11. This looks so so good! I’m hungry now.

    Reply
  12. I’ve always had these with fresh mint instead of cilantro/coriander, and it’s definitely NOT bland like that!

    Reply
  13. I had never heard cilantro called coriander leaves before

    Reply
  14. Coriander leaves= cilantro
    Same thing. FYI

    Reply
  15. Reblogged this on Be BRAVE and BOLD and commented:
    CRAVINGGGGG!

    Reply
  16. So good! I grated the carrot and cuke then rough chopped the shrimp and rice noodles. Toss everything together and it is much easier/quicker to wrap. Yours are prettier though.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

About droolfactor

It's all about my gastronomical journeys, and sometimes an inedible thought or two. One of the very nicest things about life is the way we must regularly stop whatever it is we are doing and devote our attention to eating. ~Luciano Pavarotti and William Wright, Pavarotti, My Own Story This is my personal journey where I devote my attention to eating, cooking, experimenting and taking chances. Anything I come across with a droolfactor worth sharing, it's here. I hope you'll enjoy this journey with me.

Category

Asian Yums, Home attempts, Recipes, Rice, Noodles, Pasta, Seafood, Veggies & Salads

Tags

, , , ,