August 27, 2014

Ricotta Gnocchi

The last time I posted about gnocchi, a number of you cringed, bleurghed and boo’d the fact that I had opted for store bought ones, claiming that it’s too easy to make and that it is so much better fresh. I’m sure if I had been italian, my nonna would have turned in her grave. But hey, I’m Asian and my grans had never had anything to do with my love for food (sad face) also most of the time, I’m just never prepared. But maybe this ricotta gnocchi may just be my redemption.

ricottagnocchi1

So what’s the difference between potato and ricotta gnocchi? Some people can’t tell the difference but personally, I find the ricotta gnocchi a much lighter, cloud-like version of the two. Most of the time, when I eat regular potato gnocchi, I find that a few mouthfuls and I’ll be stuffed. With the ricotta version, I couldn’t stop. Okay, maybe that’s not such a good thing?? Sorry waist.

Seriously, I don’t think I’ll go back to potato gnocchi ever.

And remember the bagna cauda from the last post? Yeah. Make a batch of fluffy ricotta gnocchi, dress with bagna cauda aka anchovy sauce, and you’ll be in cheesy, carby heaven in less than 30 minutes.

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Ricotta Gnocchi

Serves 2 hungry people

  • 250g low-fat ricotta
  • ⅓ cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 1  large egg
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 cup plain flour

Method:

1. Combine the ricotta, grated parmesan, egg and salt in a bowl.

2. Add the flour and mix. Add only as much flour as you need to create a workable dough, and be careful not to overwork it. You want a soft, light, workable dough.

3. Divide the dough into four, and roll each piece into a 2 cm-thick log. Cut into 2 cm slices and gently place on a lightly floured surface. Press down with the back of a fork to make indents in each gnocchi. Continue until all the dough is shaped. If not using immediately, chill.

4. To cook, drop gnocchi in batches in lightly salted simmering water and remove as soon as they float to the top, after 1 or 2 minutes.

5. Serve with a generous dressing of bagna cauda or your favourite pasta sauce.

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Join the conversation! 3 Comments

  1. Thanks for the recipe… Will give it a try to impress my Italian husband :P

    Reply
  2. It looks delicious! I can’t wait to try it.

    Reply

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About droolfactor

It's all about my gastronomical journeys, and sometimes an inedible thought or two. One of the very nicest things about life is the way we must regularly stop whatever it is we are doing and devote our attention to eating. ~Luciano Pavarotti and William Wright, Pavarotti, My Own Story This is my personal journey where I devote my attention to eating, cooking, experimenting and taking chances. Anything I come across with a droolfactor worth sharing, it's here. I hope you'll enjoy this journey with me.

Category

Recipes, Rice, Noodles, Pasta

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